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Swimmer's Hair Article

July 07, 2013

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We saw this article about swimmer's hair.

The authors (i.e., Barb Quinn) describe "icky swimmers’ hair," and "gross swimmers’ itch" as a side effect of chlorinated pools.  They correctly note that these side effects of chlorinated pools (dry, discolored, and damaged hair) are resistant to  showers and can ruin your perfect summer night date hair. They go on to describe ways to prevent swimmers’ hair, which can make your hair dry, discolored, and damaged.  Below we discuss their advice.

Preventing Swimmers Hair by Wetting Your Hair before Swimming.

The authors state that "a great trick is to wet and condition your hair before getting in the water." They explain that the leftover moisture from a quick rinse-off will prevent your strands from drinking up all chlorinated water.  Excellent point.  Pre-wetting your hair will help it from absorbing the chlorinated water.  Just think of your hair as a sponge.  Soaking the sponge will make it full and  less likely to soak up the pool water.

Adding Conditioner to Your Hair Before Swimming.

The authors suggest that "a little conditioner goes a long way in protecting your hair from breakage."  This advice can go both ways.  In theory, adding conditioner to your hair can provide a light short-term coating to protect the hair from chlorine.  But, one disadvantage is that the conditioner itself can react with the chlorinated pool water, generating chloramines, which are very bad for your hair.  If you want to create a barrier against the chlorinated water, better advice would be to wear a swim cap.

Preventing Swimmer's Hair with a Swim Cap

Wearing a swim cap is GREAT advice for protecting your hair from chlorine.  The authors note that "if you don’t mind sacrificing a sexy look in the pool for a healthy one later, wear a swim cap before you jump in."  A latex or silicon swim cap will prevent the pool water from touching your hair.  If the chlorine never touches your hair, it cannot damage it.  Thus, no swimmer's hair.

Products for Preventing Swimmer's Hair.

The authors recommend several haircare products for preventing swimmer's hair.  They suggest "investing in a shampoo to rid your hair of chlorine." Unfortunately none of the traditional swimmer's shampoos work because they do not have enough of the chlorine-neutralizing ingredient.  To eliminate chlorine from hair and skin, it is essential to use an concentrated antioxidant solution.  SwimSpray is the only product on the market to provide a concentrate dose of antioxidant power.  You can use SwimSpray with your favorite shampoo, giving it chlorine neutralizing power.

 



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