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US Swim Schools 2013 National Conference Introduces SwimSpray, LLC

September 18, 2013

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SwimSpray at Swim SchoolsSwim School Community Meeting SwimSpray at 2013 National Conference

SwimSpray, LLC will be attending the 2013 United States Swimming Schools National conference in Scottsdale, Arizona.  SwimSpray's Inventor and President, Andrew Chadeayne hopes the conference will provide an opportunity to discuss how to introduce SwimSpray to the Swim School Community.

SwimSpray's Place in Swimming's Chemical History

The sport of swimming has been dated back to prehistoric times, before 7000 BC. The first public swimming pool to open in the United States was in the town of Brookline, Massachusetts, in 1887.  

Pools were first chlorinated in the early 1900's.  The United States Public Health Service first published a model ordinance governing the construction, sterilization, and use of public pools in 1961.  (Generally speaking, chlorinating pools was probably the best thing that has happened to keeping swimming healthy).  

In 1974, chemists noted some side-effects of chlorinating pools. In particular, some molecules found in swimming reacted with the pool chlorine.  For example, pool chlorine reacts with swimmers' hair and skin, leaving behind a film of lingering chlorine.  

Since chlorinating pools, the swimming community has attempted to solve the problem of chlorine side-effects.  Shampoo makers have attempted to remove the lingering chlorine from swimmers hair and skin with chelating shampoos.  But these have been notoriously ineffective, leaving swimmers with an everpresent "eau de chlorine" smell for days, despite showering.  For many swimmers, the lingering chlorine becomes irritating, leading to dry, damaged hair, rashes, or irritated, itch skin.

Until now, the swimming community has faced an unmet need to eliminate chlorine from hair and skin after swimming.  SwimSpray meets this need.  SwimSpray is the first chlorine removal product that actually works to eliminate chlorine from swimmers' hair and skin.  Here's how it works:

What's Next?

Currently our greatest challenge is teaching people how to use SwimSpray.  In addition to the video, we have tried verbal instructions and graphic illustrations.  See How to Use SwimSpray.  We also receive some skepticism about whether the product will work, given the failure of so many alleged "swimmers shampoos" before us.

At the upcoming US Swim Schools 2013 National Conference, we hope to connect with Swim School leaders to brainstorm about how to distribute SwimSpray to the swim school community.



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